The Past
Author: Tessa Hadley
Narrator: Caroline Lennon

Published 2016 by Dreamscape
10 hours, 35 minutes – Unabridged

The PastGrown siblings return to their late grandparents’ country home to decide whether to keep it or sell it in this leisurely exploration of a microcosm of contemporary bourgeois English mores and family dynamics. The novel spans several weeks of a summer, in which Harriet, Alice, Roland, and Fran contemplate their shared past, scattered presents, and possible futures. Roland’s new wife Pilar, a beautiful Argentinian of regal bearing and little tendency to suffer fools, is meeting her husband’s three sisters for the first time, with mixed results. Meanwhile, the younger generation spends the long summer days pursuing their own escapades. Fran’s two children, nine-year-old Ivy and six-year-old Arthur, explore the abandoned cottage in the woods and wrestle with the implications of what they find there. Molly, Roland’s sixteen-year-old daughter from a previous marriage, and Kasim, a university student whose father is an ex-boyfriend of Alice’s, cultivate the inevitable sexual attraction, born out of lack of other options, as much as anything. The middle of the book contains an interlude of flashback to an episode in 1968 involving the siblings’ mother Jill, a poet who died of cancer when they were teenagers.

Nothing much of any note really happens in this story. That in itself is not necessarily a barrier to enjoyment or recommendation – as long as the characters are sufficiently interesting, and the dialogue and relationships between them are sparkling and memorable. Regrettably, neither of these conditions are met by The Past. Though the narrative is delivered via several different characters’ points of view, the only ones in the present day that the listener gets any sense of are young Ivy and, to a lesser degree, her aunt Harriet. The inner life of Jill in 1968 is more evident, and her story more captivating, than any of the people or goings-on in the contemporary setting – but that segment of the book is all too brief. In a book titled The Past, one expects a strong through-line from past to present, or at least a robust exploration of the effects the past has had on the people and events of the present. Here, those expectations are disappointed. The people do what they do and say what they say for no apparent reason, with only the shallowest of delving into what makes them tick.

Caroline Lennon has a pleasant voice and is a capable reader, but her efforts are not enough to lift this bland novel out of its doldrums. Her spirited evocation of Ivy, the dramatic, scheming pre-teen, represents the best of her work on this title. With so little in the way of clues from the author to distinguish between the rest of the characters, it is no wonder that Lennon’s portrayals of them are not always easy to tell apart. Ultimately, it is hard for the listener to care much what happens to any of these people or their house.

~*~

Disclaimer: I received a copy of this audiobook from the publisher as part of the Solid Gold Reviewer program administered by Audiobook Jukebox. No payment was received in return for a review. The receipt of the book had no influence on the opinions expressed in my review.

Advertisements